CLICK FOR MORE INFO: Today on day 8 the little baby Juncos left then nest. The parents are still providing them with food now that they are on the ground and learning to fly. The Dark-eyed Junco, (Junco hyemalis), is the best-known species of the juncos. This bird is common across much of temperate North America and in summer ranges far into the Arctic. Habitat: During the breeding season, Dark-eyed Juncos use a variety of forested habitat, but prefer moist conifer or mixed forests with dense understory and forest openings. During the winter, they can be found in open woodlands and brushy areas including towns, gardens, and shrub-steppe habitat. Behavior: Dark-eyed Juncos are flocking birds with a distinct social hierarchy. They forage on the ground in these groups, scratching with their feet to find food. The flash of white tail feathers serve as a signal that alerts members of the flock when one is alarmed. Diet: During the summer, about half of the Dark-eyed Junco’s diet is made up of insects and other arthropods, the other half consists of seeds. The young eat mostly arthropods. In winter, the diet shifts more to seeds and berries. Nesting: The male Dark-eyed Junco sings from a high perch to defend his territory and attract a mate. During courtship, both members of a pair hop about on the ground with their wings drooped and their tails spread, showing off their white outer tail feathers. The nest, which the female builds, is almost always on the ground. It is often in